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Tenancy Agreement.

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In order for your group to use or develop a site, a landowner will need some form of agreement. This is designed to protect both parties so the landowner ensures that their land is being using appropriately, and you and your group are given certain rights, for example, so they cannot suddenly chuck you all off the site without warning! It will also allow you and the landowner to formally agree certain things, such as access, whether small buildings (sheds) or livestock will be allowed, and what responsibilities, if any, the landowner is willing to take on e.g. repairing surrounding fencing or access gates etc. It's best to think of every eventuality you can and discuss it before anything is signed.

The simplest form of agreement is a tenancy agreement, such as the agreement between an individual plot holder and an allotment owner (e.g. the council). Usually this sort of agreement is renewed annually. If the group wishes to take on and develop a large piece of land with a view to renting out plots to individuals then a short term agreement might be insufficient, especially if you intend to apply for funding of £5000 or more to develop the project. In this case a lease is required. A lease is obviously a longer document, although this doesn’t necessarily mean you will be taking on significantly greater responsibilities, but obtaining a lease can be quite a long winded process and will often involve the use of solicitors to look over the agreement. Whether or not you involve a solicitor it is important to be very clear about the responsibilities you are taking on in signing a lease, and whether you are confident you can or should fulfil them.

Once you have established your site you will need to draw up your own tenancy agreement for individual plot holders, which will obviously be much shorter but should be based on ensuring you comply with your lease. See the next section (Site rules) for more information on tenancy agreements for plot holders.

Tenancy Agreement.

In order for your group to use or develop a site, a landowner will need some form of agreement. This is designed to protect both parties so the landowner ensures that their land is being using appropriately, and you and your group are given certain rights, for example, so they cannot suddenly chuck you all off the site without warning! It will also allow you and the landowner to formally agree certain things, such as access, whether small buildings (sheds) or livestock will be allowed, and what responsibilities, if any, the landowner is willing to take on e.g. repairing surrounding fencing or access gates etc. It's best to think of every eventuality you can and discuss it before anything is signed.

The simplest form of agreement is a tenancy agreement, such as the agreement between an individual plot holder and an allotment owner (e.g. the council). Usually this sort of agreement is renewed annually. If the group wishes to take on and develop a large piece of land with a view to renting out plots to individuals then a short term agreement might be insufficient, especially if you intend to apply for funding of £5000 or more to develop the project. In this case a lease is required. A lease is obviously a longer document, although this doesn’t necessarily mean you will be taking on significantly greater responsibilities, but obtaining a lease can be quite a long winded process and will often involve the use of solicitors to look over the agreement. Whether or not you involve a solicitor it is important to be very clear about the responsibilities you are taking on in signing a lease, and whether you are confident you can or should fulfil them.

Once you have established your site you will need to draw up your own tenancy agreement for individual plot holders, which will obviously be much shorter but should be based on ensuring you comply with your lease. See the next section (Site rules) for more information on tenancy agreements for plot holders.

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